Lovettsville VA Homes

Lovettsville VA Homes

Lovettsville is located in the northwestern part of Loudoun County, just 2.5 miles south of the Potomac River and the Maryland state line.  Between Short Hill and the Catoctin Mountains, this town is one of seven incorporated towns in Loudoun County.  Having a lot of character, Lovettsville has about 1,850 residents. Lovettsville blends centuries of history with its continued growth, while maintaining its small town charm.

Use Premier Team for all your Lovettsville VA homes  & real estate for sale. We offer real estate for sale including single family, townhouses and condos.We also offer horse farms, lots and land for sale. Contact Gene Mock, Associate Broker, Premier Team, Keller Williams Realty 703-342-8100 or Contact Gene HERE

Lovettsville VA Homes

Lovettsville, VA was an early german settlement

Originally called “The German Settlement” because of the 60 German families who were seeking agricultural rich land farm from Pennsylvania settled here in the 1730’s.  Later in the 1820’s, with a land parcel division, “city lots,” by David Lovett, it was called Newtown, because of its building and business bomb, and in 1828 changed to Lovettsville and became incorporated in 1876.

With its proximity at the intersection of the Berlin Turnpike and Lovettsville Road and an important Potomac River crossing, this town was an important stop for the Union troops, during the Civil War.  Strongly opposed to secession, Lovettsville was only one of only a small number of Virginia communities to vote against it before the Civil War.  Home to mostly farmers, craftsmen and merchants, this town had limited to slavery holdings and they planned their community.  They saw to it that there were artisans who could make clocks, cobble shoes, work metal, distill liquor, make furniture and tools, and weave cloth.  This created  opportunities for them to buy cattle, horses, swine, chickens and sheep supplying all of their needs.

Lovettsville VA Homes

The citizens of this colony were expected to attend the Church of England, a tradition of their Pennsylvanian background.  But recall that in Virginia, church and state were not separated, they functioned together as the parish roles were used to collect taxes.  The German Settlement chose to ignore this and established their own Reformed Church, which played an important role in shaping the early years of this colony.In about 1765, a group of German Lutherans arrived and established their church.which was teh predecessor of their present day church of New Jerusalem Evangelical Luthern Church.  Making sure every child was taught to read, write and cipher, the church leaders performed both duties of preacher and teacher as the public education did not become common until years later.

The German settlement was a simple lifestyle, not really primitive.  Their houses, churches and other buildings were log cabins, but not necessarily on the unrefined, small type like that is traditionally described.  Some still in existence today, are quite spacious and extensive.  The people of The Settlement prospered and enjoyed living a comfortable life yet very simple.  The German’s were very independent people.  With their lavishly costumed, slave holding, minuet dancing English neighbors, they were thought of as stupid and uncouth.  Little did they care what others thought of them, they did not correct that impression.  Their country manners, plain clothes and gruff speech was their way of life and with their agricultural know-how, they exceeded in their farming yields.  This unsophisticated and awkward community was blind to what their neighbors thought of them, plain “Yes”, but not stupid and dull “never.”

Lovettsville VA Homes

The Lovettsville Union Cemetery, the First Reformed Church site and Cemetery, the Presbyterian Cemetery are the final resting places of long-standing names associated with Lovettsville such as Axline, Roller, Everhart, Stoutsenberger, Householter, Vinzel and Wirtz.  Many of these were soldiers in the Revolutionary War and lived here during those years.  The New Jerusalem Lutheran Church, African-American Methodist Episcopal Church, the Willard Hall, the Masonic Lodge, the former Grubbs Store and Red Men’s Club are also notable assets, playing an important part of Lovettsville’s history.  Most have an indigenous interpretation of the popular architectural styles of that era to include the Queen Anne with its stone quoins emphasizing corners and center pediment set against a hipped roof with dormer windows, Italianate, usually have a presentation of rod iron somewhere, Federal, most including a bald eagle on them,  Bungalow, which included verandas and were usually low rise, and Romanesque, featuring more simplified arches and windows. Lovettsville  was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in August of 2012.

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